Red orach and sweet peas in the Potager

IMG_0436

The red orach (tall purplish plant with red stems) must have come as seeds smuggled in with some of the other plants from my old garden.  I’m letting some stay.  It is prolific but its red leaves are easy to spot in the spring so each year I cut off most of the seed heads before they spread and just leave a few to make new plants for the next year.

I love how the blue fescue picks up on the sky blue garage door.  Yes, I planned that.  🙂

fruit bounty

Just came home from over a week away to Saskatoon and raspberry shrubs loaded down with fruit:

IMG_0426

IMG_0427

What a wonderful thing to come home to!

Unfortunately we are in the middle of a kitchen reno so I can’t try any yummy looking recipes that others have recently posted, so at our house we are eating and freezing as many as possible at the moment.  But I am bookmarking this recipe for next year:

Recipe: Saskatoon berry drink mix, two ways.

Another goal for next year will be to clean up the raspberry patch – stake them better and dig out all those thistles…

clematis, white bellflowers, and sweet alyssum in the “White Garden”

IMG_4062

The clematis vines are *just a little* on the short side this year because I moved them in spring.  They were such buggers to dig up that I’m really just happy they survived at all!  The few flowers emerging (so far) on the left one are a bonus:IMG_4061

This is a pretty big change from the gravel filled strip that was this garden when I moved in less than a year ago (see the first post here).

(Yes, I did originally plan for this area to be a “White Garden” but I didn’t have anywhere else to put the existing clematises (clematii?) so I guess it is technically white and purple now.  I am terrible at sticking to a theme! On the other hand, this revised colour scheme is one good reason to also plant the annual sweet alyssum (small white and purple puffs of flowers across the front of this garden area, top photo) and the other, of course, is that it smells wonderful. At least I can turn my garden design weaknesses into something positive.)

 

the Sunset Garden, June 2017

IMG_4047

This garden has been in place for a month now, and so far the hares haven’t touched anything except the artemesia, yarrow, and iceland poppy (see this past post for more plant details).  These are all pretty vigorous plants so if the rabbits only munch these occasionally and leave everything else alone, I will be more than happy.

A friend asked me if I would use mulch, and I will, but I’ve already thought of a few tweaks I’d like to make – a plant to move here, a tree to add there.  So I will have to live with a bit of a weedy garden for a few more months – it’s easier to put mulch down after the planting is done.  Plus I’m still tired from my May new-garden-making marathon.  No more planting/moving until fall.

IMG_4046

To see how this garden area has evolved, click here and scroll down.

dark fuschia peony and painted daisies

IMG_4029

This fuschia peony in the ‘Sissinghurst’ area of my garden is the second of 5 to bloom.  It is lovely but not scented.  Possibly the variety “David Harum”?

I love both these plants but not exactly where they are planted.  I don’t think the painted daisies are getting enough light.  Plus, why would someone plant painted daisies right behind a peony as they are the same height??

Since this is my first year in this house, I’m waiting to see what else is growing in this area of the garden and how well everything does, and I then I will do some moving things around in the fall.

IMG_4031